Demolishing the Demographic Double Standard: Why more manga “for boys” need to treat their girls better [AniFem]

In my years consuming media, I’ve encountered certain beliefs and behaviours that never fail to frustrate me. One of them is women’s entertainment and their creators being diminished or regarded with contempt just for targeting women. There is a double standard at play: media targeted at or starring women is “for girls,” while media targeted at or starring men is “for everyone” (unless, of course, someone who isn’t a man is critical of it; then it wasn’t “for them”). Continue reading “Demolishing the Demographic Double Standard: Why more manga “for boys” need to treat their girls better [AniFem]”

Sannin Musume: The Biggest Female Stars of The Early Post-War Era [Yatta-Tachi]

After World War II, the occupation forces brought a cultural change to Japan. The opening of several nightclubs throughout the country saw the import of western musical styles that were popular in the day, such as bebop, jazz, swing, mambo, among others. This also led to the birth of Kayōkyoku (歌謡曲; Pop Tune), which is basically a mix of western and Japanese music, also considered to be the base of what we know as J-pop. Continue reading “Sannin Musume: The Biggest Female Stars of The Early Post-War Era [Yatta-Tachi]”

Gender Inequity in My Hero Academia [AniFem]

My Hero Academia is one of my favorite series in recent years. Thanks to its compelling, lovable cast and exciting world-building, it’s some of the most fun I’ve ever had with shounen and superheroes. Regrettably, though, it’s not entirely free of some of the most frustrating (and typical) shounen stereotypes that frequently undermine its strong female cast.

… Read the rest of the piece on Anime Feminist!


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How Yuri!!! On ICE helped me understand myself [AniFem]

Last year, Yuri!!! On Ice took the anime community by storm. Whether it was from the passionate portrayal of figure skating, the queer romance, or the sincere way it cared for its characters, it resonated with many. I’m no exception.

For a little context: I always felt a lot of interest in the LGBT community, even when I was too young to know it by name or understand its implications. I never got too deep into it, but Xena and Gabrielle’s relationship from Xena: Warrior Princess caught my attention in ways others didn’t when I was a little girl. Years later, I researched the history of homosexuality to defend it on a school panel, where I found, among many other things, tales such as the one about Pan Zhang and Wang Zhongxian.

…Read the rest of the piece on Anime Feminist!


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My Fave is Problematic: Ranma 1/2 [AniFem]

When I read Ranma ½ during my first year of high school, I fell in love with Rumiko Takahashi’s signature expressive art. I loved her colorful cast just as much, always getting caught up in over-the-top situations. Like many people, I remember it fondly. Yet the older I get, the harder it is to ignore some of the most problematic aspects of the series, especially how it deals with femininity.

…Read the rest of the article on Anime Feminist!


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5 Fearsome Women In Japanese Horror Stories [Yattatachi]

For many, Japan is as famous for their horror stories as they are for anime and manga. And for good reason; there is something about Japanese tales that perfectly captures what makes for a truly chilling story.

Such tales often reflect the fears, beliefs, and concerns of society at the time. Consequently, many of the stories that center around women focus on their abuse by men. In other cases, they simply play with their expected gender role, although they’re some exceptions.

A prominent example is the legend of a vengeful spirit named Kayako, who was violently murdered by her husband out of jealousy. Her legend inspired the 2004 movie The Grudge. There’s also the ever-popular Kuchisake-onna (Slit-Mouthed Woman), another vengeful spirit that was disfigured by her husband, and who reached the height of her popularity around the late 70s.

…Click here for the full article on Yatta-Tachi! 


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What My Hero Academia ignores with the absence of female mentors

One of my favorite series My Hero Academia just wrapped its second season today. Over this past few months, I definitely enjoyed watching new episodes each week, and it saddens me to see it end. As a lover of both shonen and the superheroes genre, it almost seems like MHA and I were meant to be. It’s not perfect, of course, not even close. In fact, even though I’ve been a big fan of both genres since forever, as a woman, they aren’t always easy to love.

Like its name says, the target demographic for shonen are boys, and the two biggest companies –DC and Marvel– making superheroes comics today still prioritize its male audience. Most of their creators are also men, and one of the downsides of that is that sexism is far too common in a lot of the stories they tell.

Continue reading “What My Hero Academia ignores with the absence of female mentors”